Locomotive Engineer’s NORAC Recertification Study Guide Part 1
NORAC rules are derived from the General Coda of Federal Regulations

This is the unofficial NORAC rules study guide for engineer recertification. It is based on the Lackawanna Terminal Railway’s Division Notice 5-S-801 dated August 1, 2013. Any errors are strictly those of the author. While the author tries to ensure that there is a correct (or most correct) answer to each question, final interpretation of the rules is the responsibility of the employee and the Lackawanna Terminal Railway Rules Department. The author assumes no responsibility for incorrect answers on either annual or promotion tests given by the Lackawanna Terminal Railway. Rules which are included in both the annual rules test and the triennial engineer's recertification test are in blue.Recertification only rules will be in Red. Annual rules only questions are in Green. For this rules review, rule G is not in effect so curl up around a warm monitor, grab some chips and your NORAC rule book, sip a cup for your favorite brew and take a leisurely scroll through the 2013 NORAC study guide for recertification.

Rule G, Drugs and Alcohol:

Reporting for duty or on duty in possession or under the influence of alcohol beverages, intoxicants, controlled substances, or prescribed medicines, even over-the counter medicines which affect alertness, coordination, reaction, response or safety is a violation of: 

1. Rule G 

2. Rule F 

3. Rule H 

4. Rule L

Illegally possessing or selling a drug or narcotic or other controlled substance while on duty : 

1. Is encouraged 

2. Is all right if you share the profits with your supervisor 

3. Is discouraged in public places 

4. Is prohibited

Employees having questions about possible adverse effects of prescribed medication must: 

1. Consult their nearest drug connection. 

2. Check to see if they're out of service insurance is paid up. 

3. Must ask to have a random check for substance abuse. 

4. Consult a Company medical officer before reporting to work.

Refusal to comply with a request to take a breath test or provide a urine sample: 

1. Will result in a promotion to management. 

2. Will be considered a violation of Rule "G" and the employee will be promptly removed from service. 

3. Will be considered a good decision if the employee is on drugs. 

4. Will result missing your next trip. 
Rule 4, Job Briefings:

When reporting for duty, employees whose duties require coordination with other employees must: 
1
1. Be minimally coordinated. 

2. Must hold a job briefing to review operational and safety conditions or when conditions change. 3. Must hold a job briefing unless the crew arrives late, or the briefing will delay a train, or cost the company money, or is inconvenient, or the crew doesn't want to. 

4. Contact the rules department to determine if their job requires a Job Briefing.

Job Briefings should be conducted: 

1. By the conductor. 

2. 
In your face. 

3. 
About face 

4.
 Face to face.

When not practical to have a job briefing face to face: 

1. No Job Briefing will be required. 

2. Telepathy or telekinesis will be adequate 

3. Radio or telephone communication will be adequate. 

4. The crew cannot perform service.


Rule 19(b), Engine whistle or horn signals:

When approaching a public highway-rail crossing at grade and at a whistle sign displaying "W" "W/MIX" or other specified aspect, with the engine in front, the engineer must:

1. Start the whistle at least 75 feet prior to occupying the crossing.

2. Start the whistle at least 15 seconds but not more than 20 seconds before occupying the crossing
.

3. Whistle while they work
.

4. 
Blow loudly until occupying the crossing.

Such a signal must be:

1. Prolonged or repeated until the engine occupies the crossing.
2. Prolonged until the entire train has cleared the crossing
.

3. Prolonged until the engineer's ears start to bleed
.

4. Prolonged for a prolonged time.

For multiple crossing: such a signal must be prolonged or repeated until::
1. The last crossing is occupied.

2. The engine occupies the first crossing
.

3. The engineer sees that nothing is obstructing the crossing
.

4. The Main Reservoir air is depleted.

For trains exceeding 60 MPH, the whistle must not be started:

1. More than 1 mile in advance of the public grade crossing.

2. More than ten feet from the crossing if there is active crossing protection in place
.

3. More than 1/4 mile from the public grade crossing even if the advance warning provided by the locomotive horn would be less than 15 seconds in duration
.

4. 
More than one train length in advance of the public grade crossing.

When a train is stopped at a location such that it will take less then 15 seconds for the movement to occupy a public grade crossing:

1. The engineer does not have to sound the whistle.

2. The whistle may be sounded for less than the 15 seconds provided the public grade crossing is equipped with flashing lights and gates and the gates are fully lowered and/or there are no conflicting moves
.

3. The train must proceed without occupying the public grade crossing in less than 15 seconds
.

4. The engineer may proceed ringing the bell, if equipped, and sound one long whistle until the train occupies the public grade crossing
., 
 


When approaching and passing standing trains:

1. The engineer must wave to the crew of the standing train
.

2. The engineer must blow two longs, a short, and one long on the whistle
.

3. The engineer must move away from the window if passing a train on his/her side of the cab
.

4. The engineer does not have to sound a whistle if the train is known to be unoccupied.

Rule 19(d), Engine whistle or horn sounds:

When approaching men or equipment on or near the track, regardless of any whistle prohibitions, the engineer must sound a signal:
1. ---, ---, O, ---.

2. O, O, O
.

3.O, O, O, O.

4. ---, O.

After the initial warning in the above question, the engineer must:

1. Sound two short whistles intermittently until the head end of the train has passed the men or equipment.

2. Sound short whistle signals continuously until the head end of the train has passed the men or equipment
.

3. Sound one continuous whistle until the head end of the train has passed the men or equipment
.

4.Yell at the men to get out of the way.

Rule 19g, Call for signals:

When calling for signals the engineer must sound:

1. Two longs and a short signal.

2. Two short and a long signal
.

3. Four long signals
.

4. Four short signals.

Rule 21 Communicating Signal Appliances:

The following communication signals are used in passenger service:

1. ---- When running stop at once or when stopped, apply or release the brakes.

2. OO When standing, start
.

3. OOO When standing or running backwards, back up two car lengths or when running forward stop at the next station
.

4.  OOOO When standing, brake test complete
.

5. When spotting, switching, or making up train, prepare to stop.

The communicating signal appliance may be used to control start and control a back up move only:

1. When the employee controlling the move forgot his/her radio.

2. When the employee controlling the move is too lazy to leave his/her seat on the train/engine
.

3. When the employee controlling the move is in his/her car going home
.

4. When the use of radio communication or hand signal is not practical.

When a signal to backup (OOO) is received the movement must stop after:

1. Ten car lengths unless three short sounds have been received..
2. Five car lengths unless the train collides with something very large
..
3. The distance given by the employee controlling the move
.

4. After two car lengths unless an additional three short sounds have been received.

Back up moves controlled by communicating signal, radio, or hand signal must not exceed:

1. 60 miles per hour.

2. 30 miles per hour
.

3. 30 miles per hour within interlocking limits and 40 miles per hour outside of interlocking limits
.

4. 
15 miles per hour within interlocking limits and 20 miles per hour outside of interlocking limits.

When the communicating signal appliance is inoperative and cannot be put in service without delay:

1. The train may proceed not exceeding 15 miles per hour.

2. The train may proceed when the engineer determines that all station work is complete
.

3. The train may proceed after the Conductor and Engineer have an understanding as to how the train is to be operated
.

4. The train must remain standing until the communicating signal is repaired.

Rule 22, Engine Lights:
The headlight facing the direction of movement on every train and engine must:

1. Be dimmed when running though tunnels.

2. Be turn on only when another train is approaching in the opposite direction
.

3. Be displayed brightly by day and night
.

4. Be aimed upward above the trees.

The headlight must be dimmed:

1. When standing or passing through yards where other engines are working.

2. When approaching a station where a Form D is to be received
.

3. When approaching Junctions or terminals
.

4. When standing or moving on a main track at meeting points or when standing or approaching another train in multiple track territory
.

5. 
All of the above.

When approaching or passing over a crossing:

1. The headlight must be dimmed.

2. The headlight must not be dimmed
.

3. The headlight may be dimmed
.

4. The headlight must be turned on and 
off  rapidly to warn motorists of the approaching train.


If all headlight bulbs fail enroute the engineer must
:

1. Stop the train immediately and not move it until the headlights are fixed.

2. Illuminate all external lights and notify the Dispatcher
.

3. Ring the bell continuously
.

4. Sound the engine whistle or horn frequently
.

5. 
Numbers 2, 3, and 4.

Trains approaching highway crossings at grade:

1. Can sneak up on the crossing and scare the motorists.

2. Must approach grade crossings prepared to stop and proceed over the crossing not exceeding 20 miles per hour
.

3. Reduce speed at other locations when required by prevailing conditions not exceeding 50 miles per hour at night
.

4. 
Numbers 2 and 3.

The restrictions above do not apply:

1. When the train is late.

2. When the crew is close to an hours of service violation
.

3. For unscheduled trains
.

4. When the train has operable auxiliary lights.

Auxiliary Lights:

Engines that operate over crossings at speeds greater than 20 MPH:

1. Must be equipped with speed control.

2. Must be equipped with Epic Brakes
.

3. Must be coupled to a train
.

4. Must be equipped with auxiliary lights
.


Auxiliary lights consist of:
1. Flashing strobe lights mounted on the cab roof
.

2. A high intensity flashlight carried by the engineer
.

3. Two ditch lights, two crossing lights, or one oscillating light. 

4. Two lights which come on bright when the locomotive’s headlights are on high
.


Auxiliary lights are considered operative when:

1. They illuminate after the engine horn and/or bell is sounded or the auxiliary light switch is activated
.

2. They illuminate after the engine has passed the crossing
.

3. They are aimed so as to blind oncoming engineers
.

4. All of the above
.


Auxiliary lights must be operational:

1. Before the engine arrives at the first grade crossing.

2. When the engine goes in for it's 92 day inspection
.

3. Whenever the mechanical department gets around to it
.

4. Before the engine leaves it's initial terminal.

If the auxiliary lights fail enroute:

1. The train must be stopped and not proceed until the lights are repaired.

2. The train must proceed without stopping to the next maintenance facility that can repair the lights
.

3. The train must not exceed 20 miles per hour while the leading end is operating over public grade crossings
.

4. The train must return to its originating terminal.

Rule 24, Markers:

Passenger trains, lite engines, and engines operating on the rear of a train must:

1. Be running at all times.

2. Be equipped with an illuminating marker or rear headlight on low beam at all times
.

3. Must have a conductor on the rear end dropping fusees every half mile
.

4. Must be in constant communications with other trains to avoid a collision.

Trains other than passenger trains:

1. Do not need a lighted marker at any time.  

2. Must be equipped with a lighted marker from one hour before sunset to one hour after sunrise
.

3. Must be equipped with a lighted marker when visibility is so restricted that the end silhouette of a box car cannot be seen from one half mile on straight track
.

4. 
Numbers 2 and 3.

During periods other than described above:

1. No marker is required.

2. Trains must be operated very carefully
.

3. A reflector, flag, or extinguished marker may be used
.

4. The Dispatcher must be notified so that he may put a block on behind the train
.


When an illuminating marker is required en route:

1. It must be tested one half hour before use so as not to drain the battery.

2. It must be tested before it leaves it's initial terminal
.

3. It need not be tested if it was tested at the factory
.

4. It must be tested during 
it's 92 day inspection.

If the marker fails en route:

1. The train must stop and not move until the marker is fixed and the Dispatcher notified.

2. The train can continue to the next point where the marker can be repaired. The Dispatcher must be notified as soon as practical
.

3. The train can continue to 
it's final destination. Nothing further is required.

4. 
All of the above.

Rule 80, Restricted Speed:

Controlling the movement to permit stopping within half the range of vision short of other trains or railroad equipment occupying of fouling the track, obstructions, switches not properly lined for movement, derails set in the derailing position, any signal requiring a stop, looking out for broken rail and misaligned track, and not exceeding 20 mph outside interlocking limits and 15 mph within interlocking limits: 
1. Are ways to stay in 
service. 

2. Are not important if you are not the engineer. 

3. Are not important if you are not on the leading end of the movement. 

4. Are requirements for movements made at Restricted peed
.
5. Numbers 1 and 4.

When moving at Restricted Speed, the speed of the move applies: 

1. Until the engineer thinks its okay to go faster. 

2. 
Until the conductor wakes up. 

3. Restricted Speed does not apply if no one is watching. 

4. 
To the entire movement.

Rule 94, Responsibilities of Employees: Signals and Restrictions:

Employees qualified on the operating rules and located on the leading engine or car must:
1. Be on the lookout for bars and restaurants along side the track
.

2. May sleep as long as the engineer promises to stay awake
.

3. Be on the lookout for signals affecting the movement of their train
.

4. Not do the daily crossword puzzle if the train is moving
.


Employees qualified on the operating rules and located on the leading engine or car must:

1. Communicate to each other in a clear manner their lunch order
.

2. Must communicate to each other in a clear manner their plans for the weekend
.

3. Must communicate to each other in a clear manner the latest sports scores
.

4. Must communicate to each other in a clear manner the name of each signal as soon as it becomes clearly visible.

After the name of each signal has been communicated:
1. The employee may go back to sleep
.

2. The employee may continue reading the paper
.

3. The employee may return to his crossword puzzle
.

4. The employee must observe it until passed.

Any change in the signal:
1. Can be ignored if the signal's original aspect was clearly seen and communicated to others in the cab or leading car.
2. Can be ignored if the preceding signal was a signal to proceed
.

3. Must be communicated in the required manner
.

4. Must be communicated in the required manner only if it is a Stop signal.


When a train reaches a point 2 miles from a temporary speed restriction
:

1. Employees qualified on physical characteristics and located on the leading engine or car must immediately communicate with the engineer and confirm the requirements of the restriction.
2. Employees qualified on physical characteristics and located on the leading engine or car must immediately communicate with the engineer and then jump off the leading engine or cars
.

3. Employees qualified on physical characteristics and located on the leading engine or car must immediately communicate with the engineer screaming. "Danger, Danger, Danger"
.

4. Employees qualified on physical characteristics and located on the leading engine or car must immediately communicate with the engineer then fall back to sleep.

If a train is not operated in accordance with the requirements of a signal indication or speed restriction:
1. Qualified employees on the leading engine or car must jump for their lives
.

2. Qualified employees on the leading engine or car must communicate with the engineer immediately and if necessary, stop the train
.

3. Qualified employees on the leading engine or car can ignore the problem if the engineer is senior to them
.

4. Qualified employees on the leading engine or 
car  can ignore the problem if the engineer  is, or was, a member of management.

Calling Signals on Push Pull Trains without cab signals for the direction of movement in territory where the speed limits exceeds 30 MPH:
When a wayside signal affecting the movement of the train displays an Approach, Medium Approach, Slow Approach, Restricting, or Stop and Proceed aspect:
1. The engineer can ignore the signal if he passed the NORAC rules test within the previous nine months
.

2. The engineer must communicate the signal to the Dispatcher so he can display a more favorable aspect
.

3. The engineer must communicate to a road Foreman the name and location of each signal
.

4. The engineer must communicate to a qualified employee on the engine or train the name and location of each signal as soon as the signal becomes clearly visible.

When in multiple track territory:
1. The trainmen can become confused
.

2. The engineer can become confused
.

3. Everyone can become confused
.

4. The engineer must include the track number.

The qualified employee:

1. Can ignore the engineer.

2. Must repeat the signal information in Spanish to exercise his language skills
.

3. Must repeat the signal information to the engineer
.

4. Can ignore the engineer if he is busy with a passenger
.


If the qualified employee fails to repeat the required signal information:
1. The engineer must "dump" the train
.

2. The engineer must call the Dispatcher and complain about the qualified employee
.

3. The railroad must initiate termination proceedings against the qualified employee
.

4. The engineer must determine the reason at the next station stop.

If the engineer fails to properly control the speed of the train:
1. The qualified employee must save himself by jumping off the train
.

2. The railroad must initiate termination proceedings against the engineer
.

3. The qualified employee must notify the Dispatcher immediately and complain about the engineer
.

4. The qualified employee must immediately communicate with the engineer and, if necessary, stop the train.

The next signal, when more favorable:
1. Can be ignored
.

2. Must also be communicated by the engineer
.

3. Can be ignored if the last signal was a signal to proceed
.

4. 
All of the above.

Rule 121, Intervening tracks at a station platform:

When a passenger train is receiving or discharging passengers on the side toward a station platform: 

1. The crew need not protect against trains passing between the train and the station. 

2. Dispatchers must advise opposing trains of that fact. 

3. Trains must pass between it and the platform at slow speed. 

4. Trains must not pass between it and the station platform.

A passenger train routed to a track that will result in a station stop for receiving and discharging passengers across a main track or controlled siding must: 

1. Protect passengers against opposing traffic according to rule 99a. 

2. Stop immediately and obtain assurance from the dispatcher that protection on the track adjacent station platform has been provided. 

3. Bypass the station stop. 

4. Stop and request a route to the other track.

Trains routed to a track that will result in a station stop across a main track or controlled siding do not have to stop if: 

1. They don’t want to. 

2. The engineer can see that no trains or track cars interfere with the station stop. 

3. Written or verbal assurance of protection has previously been provided or the track adjacent to the station platform is out of service. 

4. The train is late or a delay would be incurred by stopping

The Dispatcher must not give permission to discharge across a main track or controlled siding until: 

1. It has been determined that no train is approaching the station on the track to be protected. 

2. All trains involved have been advised as to how to proceed to insure passenger safety. 

3. Signals governing entrance to that track are placed at stop and blocking devices applied. 

4. 
All the above.

Protection against other trains is not required when discharging across a main track or controlled siding when: 
1. The crew sees that no opposing trains are in sight. 

2. The stop is made during daylight hours. 

3. A delay would be incurred by such protection. 

4. The specific station is designated in the Timetable as one where scheduled trains normally receive and discharge passengers across a track between the train and the station platform.

Trains operating on tracks across which passengers are normally received and discharged must approach such stations: 

1. At restricted speed until they occupy the station. 

2. Prepared to stop until the engineer has determined that no passenger train is occupying the station. 

3. 
At track speed, 

4.
 At a speed not to exceed 30 mph until the engineer determines that no train is occupying the station.

The engineer can determine that no passenger train is occupying the station by: 

1. Telepathy. 

2. 
Visual observation or verbal confirmation from the Dispatcher. 

3. 
Hand signal from the Trainmaster. 

4. Observing the signal at the end of the station platform.

If a passenger train is occupying the station the approaching train: 

1. Can proceed into the station at Restricted Speed. 

2. Must not occupy the station unless permission is received from the crew of the train occupying the station. 

3. The engineer must dump the air. 

4. 
2 and 3.

When a train is approaching, the station platform must not: 

1. Be occupied by passengers preparing to board the approaching train. 

2. Be occupied by trains operating on an out-of-service track adjacent to the platform. 

3. Be occupied by track cars operating on an in-service or out-of-service track adjacent to the platform. 

4. 
2 and 3.

At these stations: 

1. Trains, other than passenger trains, must not block access to the station platform. 

2. Trains, other than passenger trains, can block access to the platform if the track they are on is out-of-service. 

3. Can block access to the platform during daylight hours only. 

4. 
2 and 3.

Rule 124, Maximum Authorized Speed:

Trains must not be operated:

1. In excess of the speed of sound.

2. Before the engineer has had his nap
..
3. Before lunch
.

4. In excess of the maximum authorized speed.

Rule 131 protecting work locations, Qualified Employee's Duties:

Qualified employees assigned to protect work locations of railroad construction or private contractors whose operations affect the safe movement of trains must:

1. Secure flagging equipment and ensure that tracks are not fouled without permission.

2. Get permission to foul tracks
.

3. Report workers who fail to comply with instructions of the employee
.

4. Take action if safe passage of trains is endangered
.
5. All of the above.

Rule 132, Protection When Fouling or Working on a Track:

Trains must be protected against:

1. Falling space debris.

2. Sexually transmitted diseases
.

3. Invasion by evil spirits
.

4. 
Any known condition that may interfere with their safe passage.

If work on an adjacent track will create a condition interfering with the safe passage of trains:

1. That work must continue at a very quick pace until completed.

2. That work must continue through lunch
.

3. That work must not be attempted without permission of the employee in charge of the track
.

4. That work must not be attempted without permission of the Train Conductor.

On track where ABS, DCS, or Interlocking rules are in effect the Dispatcher (or Operator) must:
1. Update his/her out-of-service insurance
.

2. Let the relieving Dispatcher provide protection
.

3. Assure that protection against trains in both directions has been provided
.

4. 
None of the above.

If the work involves on-track equipment or will disturb the track or catenary structure so that it would be unsafe for Normal Speed: 

1. The work cannot be started
.

2. The Dispatcher must relieve himself from duty
.

3. The Dispatcher must call his/her mom for advice
.

4. The Dispatcher must issue a Form D, line 4 or 5.

If the work will not disturb the track or catenary structure:

1. The Dispatcher needs to do nothing.

2. The work can proceed without protection
.

3. The work must not begin until it disturbs the track or catenary structure
.

4. The Dispatcher can verbally authorize Foul Time in accordance with Rule 140.

Foul Time or Form D, line 4 or 5 can:

1. Only be issued to employees who are well fed.

2. Only be issued to employees qualified to fly airplanes.
3. Only be issued to employees who are qualified on the operating rules and physical characteristics of the territory involved
.

4. None of the above
.

If an event occurs or conditions are found that may interfere with the safe passage of trains or no protection has been provided:

1. All employee involved will be fired
.

2. All roadway workers will be arrested
.

3. Employees must immediately attempt to stop trains by radio communications to trains or Dispatcher and provide flag protection until the unsafe condition has been corrected
.

4. 
All of the above.

Rule 133, removing a track from service:

The Dispatcher must not issue a Form D, line 4 authority until: 

1. Determine that the affected track is clear of movements that are not part of the work group. 

2. Controlled signals leading to the track are in Stop position. 

3. Blocking devices are applied to the controls of switches and signals leading to the affected track. 

4. 
All of the above.

The Form D, line 4 must be addressed to: 

1. The employee requesting the use of the track and the operators controlling entrance to the track. 

2. 
The employee requesting use of the track and the Chief Dispatcher. 

3. 
The employee requesting use of the track and all trains operating over the Division. 

4. 
The employee requesting the track only.

A whole mile post, a station or other physical characteristic, and a track barricade or flagman at a designated location: 

1. Are used to define each end of the out-of-service limits. 

2. Are put across the track to stop a train. 

3. Are things you see along the 
tracks. 

4. Are clues that you work for a 
railroad.

ABS, CSS, DCS, and interlocking rules: 

1. Apply within the out-of-service track. 

2. Do not apply within the out-of-service limits. 

3. Must be taken out of service by Form D, line 13. 

4. Apply depending on the reason for the track being out of service.

All movements within the out-of-service track: 

1. Must proceed at restricted speed. 

2. Must proceed at slow speed, prepared to stop short of obstructions. 

3. Must proceed not exceeding 
30 mph. 

4. Must proceed at yard speed not exceeding 15 mph, prepared to stop short of obstructions.

The employee in charge of the out-of-service limits: 

1. Is very important. 

2. Should have out-of-service insurance. 

3. Can leave the area once the work has started. 

4. Is the employee named in Form D, line 
4

In territory where non-signaled DCS rules apply in both directions, the employee in charge of the out-of-service limits:

1. May authorize trains to operate within the out-of-service limits at Normal Speed not exceeding 30 mph.

2. May authorize trains to operate within the out-of-service limits at Restricted Speed
.

3. May authorize trains to operate within the out-of-service limits at Medium Speed
.

4. May authorize trains to operate within the out-of-service limits at Parade Speed not exceeding 45 mph.



Before the in charge of the out-of-service limits may authorize trains to operate at Normal Speed not exceeding 30 mph:

1. The track must be clear and safe to operate at the authorized speed'

2. All affected switches must be secured in the normal position
.

3. All Roadway Workers must be notified

4. 
All of the above.

Trains given authorization to operate within the out-of-service limits at Normal Speed not exceeding 30 mph must:

1. Not stop anywhere in the out-of-service limits.

2. Not exceed Restricted Speed. 

3. Not reverse direction without permission of the employee in charge
.

4. Must not stop for lunch before leaving the out-of-service limits.

After obtaining permission of the employee named in Form D, line 4 and the employee in charge of the out-of-service limits has shown or read him the Form D, Line 4: 

1. The Chief Dispatcher can allow additional equipment into the out-of-service limits. 

2. The Trainmaster can allow additional equipment into the out-of-service limits. 

3. The employee in charge of the additional equipment can move additional equipment into the out-of-service limits. 

4. The Dispatcher can allow additional equipment into the out-of-service limits.

When the out-of-service limits are published by Bulletin Order: 

1. The Form D must also have a line 13 indicating the Bulletin Order number and line. 

2. A new Form D has to be issued for each piece of equipment allowed into the out-of-service limits. 

3. Additional equipment can travel freely into and out of the out-of-service limits. 

4. The delivery or reading of the Form D, Line 4 is not required.

When a track is returned to service, the employee in charge of the out-of-service limits must: 

1. Notify the Dispatcher of any restrictions necessary for the safe passage of trains. 

2. Ascertain that all track cars and trains are clear of the track and notify the Dispatcher or Operator that they are clear unless the equipment is authorized by the Dispatcher to occupy the track after it is returned to service. 

3. Pick up all his tools. 

4. Promptly leave the area. 

5. 
1 and 2.

If the movement to the out-of-service limits will involve passing a stop signal:

1. The person in charge of the additional equipment can pass the stop signal at his discretion.

2. The person in charge of the out-of-service track can give permission for the additional equipment o pass the stop signal
.

3. The Dispatcher or Operator may authorize movement in accordance with Rule 241
.

4. The additional equipment must not enter the out-of-service limits.

When a train is authorized by the Dispatcher to occupy a track after it has been returned to service: 

1. The permission must include direction if governed by rule 251. 

2. The permission must include direction if governed by DCS rules. 

3. The permission must include direction if governed by rule 261. 

4. Does not have to include direction unless the crew requests it.

Rule 134, Movement within In-service Portion of Track:

In ABS Territory, when a portion of the track between Interlockings, Controlled Points, or TBS's is removed from service, movements within the In-service portion of track must be made as follows:

Movements in the direction of the out-of-service track must be notified of the limits of the out-of-service track by:
1. Email.
2. Text message.
3. Bulletin Order, Form D line 4 or line 13.
4. Smoke rising from the wreckage.

Dispatchers (or Operators) must not display signals nor give authority for movements in the direction of the out-of-service track until:

1. They are sure their out-of-service insurance is paid up.

2. The next trick Dispatchers come on duty
.

3. All trains on the railroad have been stopped
.

4. Form D line 4 or 13 
have been delivered or they have verified that the engineer is aware of the Bulletin Order item.

Movements operating in the out-of-service track must not enter the In-service Track portion:

1. Ever.
2. Without a signal from the Conductor
.

3. Without permission of the Dispatcher
.

4. Unless 
their out-of-service insurance is paid up.

Rule 135, Protection by stop signs when in service track is obstructed for maintenance:

Working Limits: 

1. The area between the start of the Approach sign and the Stop Sign. 

2. The area designated by Form D, Line 5 or Bulletin Order, which must be identified by a whole mile post, station, or other physical characteristic location. 

3. 
The area within the limits of a block. 

4. 
The area where employees are working.

When a Form D, line 5 is issued to obstruct a track, it must be addressed to: 

1. The employee requesting to obstruct the track.

2. Trains approaching the obstructed track
.

3. The local postmaster
.

4. 
1 and 2.

When the Restricted Area is published by Bulletin Order: 

1. The employee wishing to obstruct the track does not need a Form D, line 5. 

2. The Form D, Line 5 issued to approaching trains is not required. 

3. The Form D, line five must include the times noted in the Bulletin Order. 

4. 
1 and 2.

The approach to the Working Limits must be indicated by: 

1. An Approach Working Limits Sign. 

2. 
An Approach Sign. 

3. 
A Stop Sign. 

4. 
A Distant Signal Marker.

The Working Limits must be indicated by: 

1. A Stop Sign and a Working Limits Resume Speed Sign. 

2. 
A flagman with the proper flagging equipment. 

3. A tree dropped across the track
.

4. 
Roadway workers standing in the gauge.

An Approach sign indication will not apply when:

1. Permission has not been given to foul the track.

2. The roadway workers have gone to lunch
.

3. No trains are scheduled to arrive within thirty minutes
.

4. Permission is received to proceed past the Stop Sign.

A Working Limits Stop Sign:

1. May be substituted for the Approach Sign.

2. Is not needed if the Approach Sign has not been placed
.

3. If the speed of the track is less than thirty miles per hour
.

4. If a Working Limits Speed Limit Sign is substituted for the Stop Sign when the track is not obstructed.

Rule 137, assisting an attended Disabled Train:

Opposing movements in Rule 261 Territory:

Before giving permission for an opposing movement in Rule 261 territory Dispatcher must: 

1. Be well rested. 

2. Issue a Form D, line 8 to the disabled train. 

3. Must issue a Form D, line 9 to the disabled train. 

4. Must issue a Form D, line 2 to the disabled train.

A crew member of the disabled train must:

1. Provide lunch for the crew of the assisting train.

2. Provide flagging protection against the opposing movement
.

3. Assume a position of rest until the assisting train arrives
.

4. Keep an eye out for the assisting train.

After issuing a From D, line 8 to the disabled train the Dispatcher: 

1. Can go to lunch. 

2. Can be relieved to relieve 
himself. 

3. Must issue a Form D, line 9 to the assisting train. 

4. Must issue a Form D, line 13 to the assisting train.

For an opposing movement to assist a train: 

1. ABS rules are in effect. 

2. ABS rules are not in effect. 

3. ABS anti-lock systems are in effect. 

4. ABS anti-lock systems are cut out.

Opposing movements in Rule 251 Territory:

Before giving permission for an opposing movement in Rule 251 territory Dispatcher must: 

1. Be well rested. 

2. Issue a Form D, line 8 to the disabled train. 

3. Must issue a Form D, line 9 to the disabled train. 

4. Must issue a Form D, line 2 to the disabled train.

A crew member of the disabled train must:

1. Provide lunch for the crew of the assisting train.

2. Provide flagging protection against the opposing movement
.

3. Assume a position of rest until the assisting train arrives
.

4. Keep an eye out for the assisting train.

The Dispatcher must:

1. Issue a Form D line 5 to the assisting train.

2. Issue a Form D line 2 to authorize the assisting train to operate to the whole mile post or station at least 2 miles prior to the disabled train
.

3. Issue a Form D line 9 to the assisting train from a point 2 miles prior to the disabled train to operate to the disabled train
.

4. 
2 and 3.

DCS Rules:

1. Apply to the portion of the movement governed by the Form D line 9.

2. Do not apply to the portion of the movement governed by Form D line 9
.

3. Apply where required by Bulletin Order
.

4. 
All of the above.

Opposing movement on tracks where DCS rules are in effect in both directions:

Before giving permission for an opposing movement where DCS rules are in effect in both directions the Dispatcher must: 

1. Issue a Form D, line 8 to the disabled train. 

2. Cancel the disabled train's Form D line2.  

3. Inform a crew member of the disabled train that an opposing movement will be authorized
.

4. 
All of the above.

A crew member of the disabled train must:

1. Provide lunch for the crew of the assisting train.

2. Provide flagging protection against the opposing movement
.

3. Assume a position of rest until the assisting train arrives
.

4. Keep an eye out for the assisting train.

The Dispatcher must:

1. Issue a Form D line 5 to the assisting train.

2. Issue a Form D line 2 to authorize the assisting train to operate to the whole mile post or station at least 2 miles prior to the disabled train
.

3. Issue a Form D line 9 to the assisting train from a point 2 miles prior to the disabled train to operate to the disabled train
.

4. 
2 and 3.

DCS Rules:

1. Apply to the portion of the movement governed by the Form D line 9.
2. Do not apply to the portion of the movement governed by Form D line 9
.

3. Apply where required by Bulletin Order.
4. All of the above.

Following movement where Non-signaled DCS Rules are in effect:

Before giving permission for a following movement where Non-signaled DCS rules are in effect the Dispatcher must: 

1. Issue a Form D, line 8 to the disabled train. 

2. Cancel the disabled train's Form D line2.  

3. Inform a crew member of the disabled train that a following movement will be authorized
.

4. 
All of the above.

A crew member of the disabled train must:

1. Provide lunch for the crew of the assisting train.

2. Provide flagging protection against the following movement
.

3. Assume a position of rest until the assisting train arrives
.

4. Keep an eye out for the assisting train.

When a freight train is operating without a crew member at the rear end:

1. Prepare for a rear end collision.
2. The crew of the disabled train must stand at least two hundred yards from the potential point of impact
.

3. Flag protection is not required when the assisting train is in contact with the disabled train
.

4. 
None of the above.

The Dispatcher must:

1. Issue a Form D line 5 to the assisting train.

2. Issue a Form D line 2 to authorize the assisting train to operate to the whole mile post or station at least 2 miles prior to the disabled train
.

3. Issue a Form D line 9 to the assisting train from a point 2 miles prior to the disabled train to operate to the disabled train
.

4. 
2 and 3.

DCS Rules:

1. Apply to the portion of the movement governed by the Form D line 9.

2. Do not apply to the portion of the movement governed by Form D line 9
.

3. Apply where required by Bulletin Order
.

4. 
All of the above.

Rule 138, Highway crossing warning:

Activating/reactivating Crossing Warning

Which of the following indicate the start of a crossing gate circuit: 

1. A yellow sign or post with the letters "CC". 

2. Yellow joint bars. 

3. Yellow strip painted on the inside and outside of the head, web, and base both rails. 

4. 
All the above.

On tracks other than main tracks or controlled sidings, movement over this point will: 

1. Cause the train to derail. 

2. Cause an accident at the crossing. 

3. Activate an alarm, which will automatically summon police and fire units. 

4. Activate the automatic crossing warning.

On a main track or controlled siding, movement over this point will: 

1. Cause death and destruction. 

2. Cause termination of the engineer and crew. 

3. Activate a water cannon to stop the pedestrian traffic. 

4. Reactivate the operation of automatic crossing warning that has been interrupted because of a train's delay or stop.

Two steps, which will avoid unnecessary operation of automatic crossing warning, are: 

1. The Lindy and the Foxtrot. 

2. Sending a flagman to protect the crossing and being very, very careful. 

3. Engine and cars must not be allowed to stand longer than necessary and switches must not be left open or unlocked within the operating limits of such protection. 

4. 
Deactivating the crossing protection and refusing to pass over the crossing with the train.

If automatic crossing protection is not operating properly: 

1. The engineer must refuse to pass over the crossing until the protection is fixed. 

2. Employees must immediately notify the Dispatcher who will notify all trains that will operate over the affected crossing. 3. Employees must immediately notify the Dispatcher who will call police to provide protection. 

4. 
All of the above.

The Dispatcher's notification to trains must include:

1. The location of the crossing malfunction according to the GPS locator beacon located at the crossing.

2. The type of malfunction and the details of any on-ground personnel that are know to be at the crossing
.
3. The number of trains the delay is expected to affect
.
4. The names of the crew members expected to be punished for delays to their trains
.

(Rule 138-C-1) If Automatic crossing warning devices have an activation failure or the failure type is undetermined and there are no flaggers or police providing crossing protection, trains must: 

1. Never occupy the crossing. 

2. Stop at the crossing, do not occupy the crossing until protection is provided by a 
crew member, and proceed not exceeding 15 mph until the leading end operate through the crossing. 

3. Approach the crossing prepared to stop then accelerates rapidly if no cross traffic is seen. 

4. Approach the crossing prepared to stop, have a qualified employee lay across the road to stop traffic, then proceed not exceeding 15 mph avoiding the prone employee.

(Rule 138-C-2) If Automatic crossing warning devices have a false activation or partial activation and there are no flaggers or police providing crossing protection, trains must: 
1. Proceed at Restricted Speed when the crew sees that no cross traffic is in sight. 

2. Proceed at Normal Speed when crew sees that cross traffic has stopped to allow the train to proceed. 

3. Proceed at Normal Speed when the crossing is equipped with gates and the crew sees that they are in the horizontal position and the crossing lights are flashing. 

4. Proceed, not exceeding 15 mph until the leading end operates through the crossing.

(Rule 138-C-3) If there is any type of crossing failure and a flagger is present but not for each direction of traffic the train must:

1. Proceed at Restricted Speed when the crew sees that no cross traffic is in sight. 

2. Proceed at Normal Speed when crew sees that cross traffic has stopped to allow the train to proceed. 

3. Proceed at Normal Speed when the crossing is equipped with gates and the crew sees that they are in the horizontal position and the crossing lights are flashing. 

4. Proceed, not exceeding 15 mph until the leading end operates through the crossing.

(Rule 138-C-4) If there is any type of crossing failure and a flagger is present for each direction of traffic or a railroad police officer provides protection the train must:

1. Proceed at Restricted Speed when the crew sees that no cross traffic is in sight. 

2. Proceed at Normal Speed when crew sees that cross traffic has stopped to allow the train to proceed. 

3. Proceed at Normal Speed when the crossing is equipped with gates and the crew sees that they are in the horizontal position and the crossing lights are flashing. 

4. Proceed at Normal Speed.

A Flagger is:: 

1. A member of the crew, a policeman, or an employee with a reflective vest and proper flagging equipment. 

2. 
An employee of the company, policeman, or the local rail nut who came to help. 

3. 
An officer of the company, policeman, or a helpful pedestrian. 

4. Any one willing to stand in front of enraged motorists. 

5. An employee equipped by day with a red flag and a highly visible garment and at night with a white light or 
fusee and a highly visible retro-reflective garment.

When equipment is standing and obscures highway traffic's view: 

1. It is a good thing. 

2. An employee must be ready to call an ambulance. 

3. An employee must warn the highway traffic against movement on adjacent tracks. 

4. An employee must carry a camera to record the accident.

Equipment stored on tracks close to a public crossing must: 

1. Be low to the ground so that drivers can see over it. 

2. Be stored at least 1/4
; mile from the crossing. 

3. If space permits, must not stick out onto the crossing in a way that would obstruct traffic. 

4. Be placed so as to permit a clear view for highway traffic using the crossing, at least 300 feet if space permits.

When cars not headed by an engine are to be moved over a highway crossing not protected by automatic crossing warning devices, or a designated employee: 

1. A Company of National Guard soldiers must be called. 

2. Barriers must be placed on the crossing to stop vehicular traffic. 

3. A caboose or other suitable platform must be provided for the crew. 

4. A member of the crew must provide warning for highway traffic.

When an employee is required to provide on-ground warning at a high way crossing, he must:

1. Be sure his medical is paid up.

2. Notify his future widow to call a lawyer
.

3. Give Stop Signals to Pedestrian and Highway Traffic until the leading end of the trains is through the crossing
.
4. Throw a fusee out into the crossing before he flags traffic. 



Conditions that require special procedures when fouling a public crossing are: 

1. When a train passes entirely over a crossing and then makes a reverse move. 

2. When a train approaches a crossing at Restricted Speed. 

3. When a train stops or increase speed by more than 5 mph within 0.6 miles from a crossing with an interrupt system
.. 

4. 
All of the above.

More conditions, which require special procedures when fouling a public crossing, are: 

1. When a train passes a warning device activation or reactivation point on a main track or controlled siding after having been stopped or delayed or performs switching within 1.2 miles of the crossing. 

2. When a train proceeds past a warning device activation point on other than a main track or controlled siding
.

3. When the crew stops short of the crossing to buy a few beers. 

4. 
1 and 2.

If automatic crossing warning is not operating: 

1. The train is not allowed to occupy the crossing and the Dispatcher must be notified. 
2. The train is not allowed to occupy the crossing until the crew is on overtime. 

3. The crew must stop for a couple of beers to build up their courage for the dash across the highway. 

4. The movement must not be made until 
protection is provided by on-ground personnel.

When crossing warning devices are operated manually no movement may be made until: 

1. Warning is provided by on-ground personnel, protection has been reestablished for at least 20 seconds, or gates, where equipped, are in the horizontal position and crossing lights are flashing. 

2. No Highway traffic can be seen in either direction. 

3. Police have arrived to provide protection. 

4. Crossing devices cannot be manually controlled. That's why they are called automatic warning protection.

Whenever crossing protection is interrupted manually or is manually operated: 

1. The crew can leave the crossing on manual if another employee is left in charge. 

2. The crew can leave the crossing on manual if a policeman is there to direct traffic. 

3. The crew must restore the automatic crossing warning protection unless the Chief Dispatcher authorizes otherwise. 

4. It must be restored to normal after movement is completed.

At crossings where the apparatus interrupts automatic warning on adjacent tracks: 

1. The employee interrupting warning must remain at the crossing to reestablish automatic warning to normal when a train is approaching on an adjacent track. 

2. The employee can leave the 
crossing as each approaching train must provide it's own protection. 

3. The Dispatcher must issue a Form D, line 12 to all trains that the crossing protection has been interrupted. 

4. Police or Signal Department protection must be provided for trains on crossing where the automatic protection has been interrupted.

Rule 140, Foul time:

Before Foul Time is authorized the Dispatcher must: 

1. Determine that no trains have been authorized to occupy the track segment to be fouled. 

2. Insure that Stop Signals have been displayed in signaled territory and blocking devices have been applied to the controls of switches and signals leading to the affected track. 

3. Issue Form D, line 13 to hold trains clear of the affected track at a TBS where blocking devices cannot be applied. 

4. 
All of the above. 
5. None of the above.

Permission to foul a track must include: 

1. The title and name of the employee receiving foul time and track designation and track limits, and time limits. 

2. 
Track designation and Time limits. 

3. Track designation, Track limits, and time limits. 

4. Foul language.

Once protection has been provided, it must be maintained until: 

1. The next calendar day. 

2. The time limit has been reached. 

3. The employee who was granted the Foul Time has released the foul time. 

4. 
The Foul Language stops.

Rule 141, Inaccessible Track:

Roadway workers may establish Working Limits no controlled by the Dispatcher or Operator:

1. By standing on the track and not moving when a train approaches
.

2. By making the track inaccessible at each possible point of entry by securing a switch or derail with an effective locking device
..
. Lining securing a remotely controlled switch to prevent access to the working limits
.

4. A disconnected rail or flagman to hold trains and equipment clear of the working limits
.

5. 
Numbers 2, 3, and 4.

Rule 161, Completing Form D properly:

Information on a Form D must be: 

1. Written in crayon. 

2. 
Legible and without erasure or alteration. 

3. Written in ink. 

4. Indelible.

Only authorized abbreviations: 

1. May be used when spelling the Dispatcher's name. 

2. May be used in radio communications. 

3. May be used when ordering lunch. 

4. May be used in Form D’s.

To separate numbers or locations listed in a series on a Form D you must use: 

1. Hyphens. 

2. Parenthesis. 

3. Commas. 

4. Semi-colons.

Applicable Form D line numbers must be: 

1. Crossed out. 

2. Underlined. 

3. Erased. 

4. Circled.

Employees must review the entire Form D for: 

1. Typographical errors. 
2. Misspelling. 

3. Jelly stains. 

4. Additional information.

Operators must: 

1. Keep an office copy of each Form D. 

2. Throw their copy away after 24 hours. 

3. Return their copy of the Form D to the Chief Dispatcher. 

4. Return their copy of the Form D to the Trainmaster.

Rule 165, Form D delivery:

A Form D may be:

1. Physically delivered to addressed employees.

2. Dictated to them by radio telephone or in person
.

3. Delivered by electronic transmission
.
4. All of the above.

5. 
None of the above.

When a Dispatcher or Operator physically delivers a Form D to an employee he must: 

1. Be able to jump very high to reach the locomotive cab. 

2. Hoop the Form D up the engineer. 

3. Complete the delivery portion of the top Form D in the set delivered, indicating the numbers of all Form Ds delivered.                     . 

4. Complete the delivery portion of each Form D delivered.

When an employee physically receives a Form D from a Dispatcher or operator: 

1. He must say "Thank You". 
2. He must check the Form D for misspellings. 

3. He must check the delivery portion of the first Form D to see that the information corresponds to the Form D’s delivered and give a copy of the Form D to other crew members addressed. 

4. 
#1 and #2.

Form Ds may be dictated only to:
1. An employee qualified on the physical characteristics. 

2. An employee qualified on the Operating Rules but not dictated to an employee operating the controls of a moving train. 3. An employee authorized by the conductor. 

4. The Conductor or Engineer only.

When transmitting and receiving Form D’s, employees must: 

1. Acknowledge receipt of the Form D by saying "ROGER". 

2. Repeat the information they have written in. 

3. Repeat correctly the preprinted portions only. 

4. Read aloud and plainly pronounce all applicable preprinted and written portions.

Numerals in lines one (1) through thirteen (13) must be: 

1. Written in Roman Numerals. 

2. Pronounced digit by digit, such as: 105, 
one-zero-five
3. Repeated twice for correctness. 

4. Written digit by digit, such as: 105, 
one-zero-five.

The Dispatcher must not give a "Time Effective" until: 

1. He has a cup of coffee. 

2. He is comfortable in his chair. 

3. The Form D has been repeated correctly. 

4. He receives permission from the Chief Dispatcher.

When the Dispatcher's name is given after dictating the Form D the employees receiving it must: 

1. Repeat from their copy in the same order they were addressed. 

2. Observe whether others repeat their Form D correctly. 

3. Repeat "Time Effective" after it is given. 

4. 
All the above.

When a Form D is dictated to an employee on a train, the employee must: 

1. Ensure that employees on the train who are addressed receive a copy before the first location where it is to be acted upon. 

2. Dictate the information to them if physical delivery is not practical. 

3. Walk to the rear of the train to give a copy to the load seated there. 

4. 
1 and 2.

Employees receiving a Form D by electronic transmission must:

1. Put it in their bag for later reading.

2. Fax the Form D to their crew on the train
.

3. Put the Form D in their Palm Pilot
.

4. Examine each copy for completeness and legibility then communicate with the Dispatcher to verify the number and date of each Form D received.

Rule 166, Reading and complying with Form D:

Employee addressed in a Form D: 

1. Are only responsible for complying with the Form D if they are in the leading unit of the train. 

2. Must immediately read and comply with its requirements. 

3. Can ignore the Form D if the engineer is awake. 

4. Get off the train before they get in trouble.

When practical, Form D’s must be shown to: 

1. Other employees on the train or track car who will remind the addressed employees of the requirements of the Form D. 2. The wives and friends of the employees addressed. 
3. The employees of the track department. 

4. The Trainmaster so that he can explain what the Form D means.

Ready for More? Got to the NORAC Recertification Study Guide, Part 2

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